Thursday, 31 October 2013

Happy Hallowe'en!


Wishing you all a Happy Hallowe'en!

This week my fourth Music Audio Story was released which I am very excited about. I have been in the studio for the past few weeks mixing my fifth story and creating a Christmas special story which I will tell you about later. In the meantime check out the new release...


 Audio Book 4. Jimi & his friend Joe


Based on a tabby cat with unusually large ears called Jimi, this is a story about two unlikely friends. The story takes you on a farm yard adventure and features an unexpected twist in the music. 

Product Description:
The story includes an original classical soundtrack with an unexpected twist. Character voices by Anna-Christina and Adie Hardy. Rob Stitch (singer of Rhino) as Jimi the cat, Susie Lewis (you may have seen Susie as Harriet in the Play Colder Than Here) as Moorerag the Border Collie and Tom Meadows (you can find him touring the world drumming for some of today's biggest artists such as Kylie Minogue) as Piggy the Pig and drums. Accompanied by unique sound effects throughout. 


Hope you all have a wickedly good evening,

Anna-Christina 

Tuesday, 8 October 2013

8 Year Anniversary!

Today is my 8 Year Anniversary!


On October 8th at 2pm, something felt like it snapped in my neck, followed by shooting pains in my face and a seriously mean headache that felt like my brain was moving in my head every time I moved! This was a vessel bursting in my brain. Nothing could have prepared me for what was about to happen to me.

I was taken to hospital and lucky for me, they did not send me home with migraine tablets! Instead I was rushed to Charing Cross Hospital in an ambulance early the next morning where I would spend an extraordinary 11 days. I had head x-rays, an angiogram, a five hour coiling procedure which was unsuccessful (I would be the schmuck who had an unusual bleed) and that led me to having open brain surgery for 6 1/2 hours to save my life!

I have Doctor O' Neil (the only man alive to have actually seen inside my head), the lovely Roger, Marito and Shinead to name but a few to thank and all the crew on 11 West for making my life easier whilst saving it. For a squeamish person such as myself, I have been through more than you can imagine. Fear and pain beyond belief, I've had staples in my head! I almost died but I get to live on and continue performing and making music for you lovely people.

I am an extremely lucky girl!

Anna-Christina

What is a Subarachnoid Brain Haemorrhage?


Berry aneurysms may burst if put under extra stress. The end result is a brain haemorrhage or stroke. The haemorrhage that occurs when a berry aneurysm bursts is known as a subarachnoid haemorrhage. Only about one in 7,000 people have a subarachnoid haemorrhage and not every brain haemorrhage is due to a berry aneurysm. Although about 70 per cent of subarachnoid haemorrhages are caused this way, no defect can be found in at least ten per cent, and there are other types of brain haemorrhage.

A subarachnoid haemorrhage is a particular disaster because it's often fatal - as many as 30 per cent die within hours, and a further 50 per cent die within the first month - or result in serious disability. Among the survivors of brain aneurysms, the mental capacity of around half of them will be affected.
There's often little or no warning that a subarachnoid haemorrhage is about to occur. Typically, the person collapses with a sudden headache unlike any they've experienced before. They may vomit, develop signs of meningitis, such as neck stiffness and dislike of light, and may rapidly become drowsy, confused and unconscious. In milder cases, the illness may appear like a migraine or meningitis due to an infection, but in severe cases it's quickly apparent that something is seriously wrong.

Those who survive the initial episode are at great risk of another bleed unless action is taken. The standard treatment used to be surgery, which involves opening the skull and clipping off the faulty blood vessel. This operation, known as clipping, is usually done within days. However, although the operation puts an end to the risk, it carries a risk of damage (although this risk is far less than that of a second bleed.)

In recent years, a new technique has been developed as an alternative to clipping. In this technique, known as endovascular detachable-coil treatment or coiling, a detachable plantinum coil device is inserted into the blood vessels via a small cut in the skin (usually in the groin) and passed up into the brain under x-ray guidance to block off the faulty vessel. In 2005, a long-term follow-up study of patients treated with coiling showed that it's as effective as surgery, has a lower risk of complications and offers a greater chance of survival without disability. It's now the standard treatment for most aneurysms in most areas of the UK.

Recovery from any type of stroke tends to be slow. Intensive rehabilitation therapy, including physiotherapy, speech therapy and occupational therapy, are usually needed. Depression is a common problem after stroke, and good psychological and drug treatments are essential to help recovery.
After decades of being viewed as a fairly hopeless condition where only a little positive treatment could be done, new approaches are at last starting to make some impact on recovery rates from strokes. For example, researchers have shown for the first time in humans that rehabilitation therapy may help a stroke survivor's brain rewire itself, leading to regained use of a previously unused limb.

[This article was last medically reviewed by Dr Rob Hicks in July 2006]

Saturday, 5 October 2013

The Very Best of John Barry Concert


Royal Philharmonic Orchestra:
The Very Best of John Barry


John Barry had huge success in the world of film music, having written some of the best soundtracks for the silver screen including, of course, the James Bond films.
This concert celebrated his music and featured hit pieces from: Goldfinger, Dances with Wolves, The Black Hole, Midnight Cowboy, Diamonds are Forever, Out of Africa, Born Free, Moonraker, Zulu and many more!



Conductor Nic Raine was joined by guest vocalist Alison Jiear and Lance Ellington. Presented by Tommy Pearson, a renowned authority on film music.

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Nic Raine conductor
Alison Jiear guest vocalist
Lance Ellington guest vocalist
Tommy Pearson presenter






Absolutely wonderful time last night at The Very Best of John Barry concert! The Bond theme was so sexy but Chaplin was so stunningly beautiful, it was difficult to hold back my tears, and that wasn't the result from the 2 extremely expensive glasses of red wine I had either! Such beauty and romance...


Anna-Christina